Kobo Emerging Writer Prize: Ann Y.K. Choi, M-E Girard & Lynne Kutsukake

IMG_4388The shortlist for the third annual Kobo Emerging Writer Prize was recently announced and I was so thrilled to see Canadian authors Ann Y.K. Choi, M-E Girard and Lynne Kutsukake on the list. Their debuts are some of my most anticipated so I wanted to take the time to highlight them:

Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety by Ann Y.K. Choi

Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard

The Translation of Love by Lynne Kutsukake

This award is handed out to a debut novel (published the same year) in each of three categories: Non-Fiction, Literary Fiction, and Genre Fiction (Speculative Fiction this year). Along with a $10,000 CAD cash prize, each winning author receives promotional, marketing, and communications support. This is such a big award for Canadian debut authors and I’m especially happy to see a YA title on an awards list usually dominated by adult books. If you haven’t already, add these three books to your TBR. You can check out the rest of the shortlist here.

Also, if you’ve read any of these be sure to leave a review on book retailer sites like Amazon, Chapters/Indigo and Kobo. For this specific award, book completion rates, customer ratings and reviews were considered when selecting the shortlist titles. Your reviews, even if only a few lines, do matter! You can also follow these authors on Twitter by clicking on their names below:


Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety by Ann Y.K. Choi

Simon and Schuster | May 3, 2016

Buy: Amazon | Book Depository | Chapters/Indigo.ca | B&N | Kobo

Synopsis:

A bittersweet coming-of-age debut novel set in the Korean community in Toronto in the 1980s.

This haunting coming-of-age story, told through the eyes of a rebellious young girl, vividly captures the struggles of families caught between two cultures in the 1980s. Family secrets, a lost sister, forbidden loves, domestic assaults—Mary discovers as she grows up that life is much more complicated than she had ever imagined. Her secret passion for her English teacher is filled with problems and with the arrival of a promising Korean suitor, Joon-Ho, events escalate in ways that she could never have imagined, catching the entire family in a web of deceit and violence.

A unique and imaginative debut novel, Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety vocatively portrays the life of a young Korean Canadian girl who will not give up on her dreams or her family.

-I believe this was published as adult fiction but could appeal to YA readers


28217802Girl Mans Up by M-E Girard

HarperCollins | September 6, 2016

Buy: Amazon | Book Depository | Chapters/Indigo.ca | B&N | Kobo

Synopsis:

All Pen wants is to be the kind of girl she’s always been. So why does everyone have a problem with it? They think the way she looks and acts means she’s trying to be a boy—that she should quit trying to be something she’s not. If she dresses like a girl, and does what her folks want, it will show respect. If she takes orders and does what her friend Colby wants, it will show her loyalty. But respect and loyalty, Pen discovers, are empty words. Old-world parents, disintegrating friendships, and strong feelings for other girls drive Pen to see the truth–that in order to be who she truly wants to be, she’ll have to man up.


25893533The Translation of Love by Lynne Kutsukake

Knopf Canada | April 5, 2016

Buy: Amazon | Book Depository | Chapters/Indigo.ca | B&N | Kobo

Synopsis:

Set against the pulsing backdrop of post-war Tokyo, The Translation of Love tells the gripping and heartfelt story of a newly repatriated Japanese-Canadian girl who must help a classmate find her missing sister. A dazzling New Face of Fiction for 2016 that will appeal to readers of All the Light We Cannot See and Anita Shreve.

Thirteen-year-old Aya Shimamura is released from a Canadian internment camp in 1946, still grieving the recent death of her mother, and repatriated to Japan with her embittered father. They arrive in a devastated Tokyo occupied by the Americans under the command of General Douglas MacArthur. Aya’s English-language abilities are prized by the principal of her new school, but her status as the “repat girl” makes her a social pariah–until her seatmate, a fierce, willful girl named Fumi Tanaka, decides that Aya might be able to help her find her missing older sister. Beautiful Sumiko has disappeared into the seedy back alleys of the Ginza. Fumi has heard that General MacArthur sometimes assists Japanese citizens in need, and she enlists Aya to compose a letter in English asking him for help.

Corporal Matt Matsumoto is a Japanese-American working for the Occupation forces, and it’s his overwhelming job to translate thousands of letters for the General. He is entrusted with the safe delivery of Fumi’s letter; but Fumi, desperate for answers, takes matters into her own hands, venturing into the Ginza with Aya in tow.

Told through rich, interlocking storylines, The Translation of Love mines a turbulent period to show how war irrevocably shapes the lives of both the occupied and the occupiers, and how the poignant spark of resilience, friendship and love transcends cultures and borders to stunning effect.

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